Well of Joseph 28mm scale North African terrain

$10.00

Description

The Well of Joseph 28mm scale North African terrain is an simple terrain piece designed for use as a focal point for your tables or to just add character and definition.  The layered MDF rings allow for quick and easy painting, and added highlights with gloss or water effects will tie it together exceptionally. Based on first hand reference pictures taken in Egypt and artwork through out history. This piece has been designed to try to bring as much accuracy as possible to your historical game table.

A short history of wells and plumbing in Egypt

 

 

The laser etched detail is such that light gradients of thinned paint over primed surfaces are almost all that is needed to bring this terrain kit to life. Going the extra mile with water effects or gloss paints in the interior of the well will add additional depth, creating contrast to a normally “dry” portion of the world.

Wells were historically the lifeblood of early civilizations, key to the growth of a culture and critically important in dryer climates. Your miniatures battling over control of a critical resource makes it an excellent objective point.

 

The base itself measures about 6in x 6in with a max height of 5/8ths of an inch at the water feature itself.

All international orders will be emailed a quote for exact shipping cost that will be added to our standard shipping charge

This kit is made in the USA by Ironheart Artisans from laser cut 2.5mm MDF and is a multi-part kit that will require assembly. The parts come completely cut and are NOT attached to a sheet that need to be punched out.

Miniatures shown for scale only and painted by Robert Chandler, heads by Brigade Games and bodies from Perry Miniatures.

Painted kit by Robert Chandler and Dave Taylor.

Full table shots are for scale reference only and to give you a idea of what is possible with our north african terrain range.

 

For more reference to this type of architecture

http://islamic-arts.org/2012/cairos-islamic-architecture-7th-to-18th-centuries/

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